Scottish Tour Guide's Blog

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Pittenweem

This evening, I am posting information on the fishing port of Pittenweem which is situated on the Fife Coast, about eleven miles south of St. Andrews.

The name Pittenweem is derived from the Gaelic for ‘cave place’, which is apposite because here can be found St. Fillan’s Cave, named after an early (7th century) Christian missionary. Other information:

  • A Priory was established at Pittenweem in the 13th century.
  • The Parish Church also dates from the 13th century and is joined to the Tolbooth.
  • The harbour (above) dates from the 16th century and still operates as a busy commercial fishing port.
  • Today, the town is a popular home for artists and craftpeople. There is also a chocolate making company in the High Street.
  • Many tourists are attracted to the town which boasts quaint old cottages with traditional pantile roofs.
  • Pittenweem is on the route of the Fife Coastal Path, which covers 117 miles.

Kelly Lodge, late 16th century, three storey house in High Street.

Pittenweem

Quaint Cottage, Pittenweem

Pittenweem

Pittenweem Parish Church

Pittenweem
Quaint Cottage, Pittenweem

Pittenweem

High Street, Pittenweem

Pittenweem
Heron scavaging for fish

Pittenweem
Unusual house decoration

Pittenweem

Crail Pottery
This evening, I am posting information on Crail Pottery which is located on Scotland’s Fife Coast, about 10 miles S .E.of St. Andrews.

The Fife Coast is home to many artists, galleries and craftpeople covering a wide range of skills.

Crail Pottery has a history dating back to 1965. It is housed in a classic old cottage typical of the area. Inside, all the products are made in the traditional manner using a potter’s wheel. The range includes:

  • Stoneware.
  • Terracotta.
  • Raku
  • Hand-painted earthenware.

A small but friendly business where visitors are free to browse and view the entire production process.

The village of Crail is worthy of a visit in its own right, particularly the quaint and popular harbour.

 

Crail Pottery

Crail Pottery

Crail Pottery

Crail Pottery
Traditional pottery making in process.

Crail Pottery

Hill of Tara

 

This morning, I visited the complex site known as Hill of Tara. Summary information on the site as follows:

  • Located midway between Navan and Dunshaughlin in central County Meath, about 40 minutes north of Dublin.
  • Contains a mix of graves, tombs and temples built over a long period ranging from the fourth millennium BC to the 15th century AD.
  • A historic power and religious base  centred on the Kingship of Tara.
  • Each succeeding generation and culture from the fourth millennium onwards built on the work of that which already existed.
  • The oldest monument on the site is a passage tomb of Dumha na nGiall which dates from the third millennium BC. This was excavated 1955-9 and then restored. There are some forty Bronze Age burials inserted into the soil mantle and passage.
  • Later in the third millennium a 200 m long cursus-like enclosure was built down the northern flank of the hill,
  • Next, two great henges were built just off the hill, one of which measures 270m in diameter.
  • More than 25 barrows and ring-ditches occur on Tara, mostly from the Bronze-Age.
  • A hengiform enclosure extending to 1000m in circumference encircles the crown of the hill. This dates from the Iron-Age ( 1st century BC).
  • Tech Cormaic, a bivallate ring fort is probably the latest earthwork on Tara.

The site includes a visitor centre and refreshment facilities.

Video clip of site

Hill of Tara

Hill of Tara

Hill of Tara