This evening I am presenting images from a recent tour around Scotland.

The following two images are of Doune Castle in Stirlingshire. This is located only about 7 miles from the much larger Stirling Castle. Doune was built by Robert Stewart, the first Duke of Albany who died in 1420. Doune is a formidable structure and became a Royal fortress and was used as a hunting lodge by the Stewart Court from nearby Stirling. In 1883 the castle was restored by the Earl of Moray and subsequently featured in the 1975 movie ‘Monty Python and the Holy Grail’.

This first shot is of the Great Hall which relies on a central, brazier type fire for heating.


Exterior

The following are five images are pertaining to Stirling Castle plug close to the River Forth. Stirling Castle , which sits atop an ancient volcanic plug, was strategically important because it sits astride access routes to the Highlands and Lowlands. Nearby were fought two significant battles, namely Stirling Bridge (1297) and Bannockburn (1314). Apart form its military role, the castle served as a royal palace for the Stewart dynasty.

This is inside if the Royal Chapel

A modern, but authentic tapestry from the Chapel

Scene from the Great Hall. Re-enactment minstrels

Here is the Queen and her Lady in Waiting.

View of Stirling Castle from the Wallace Monument.


The following are images of the quaint/heritage village at Luss, on the shores of Loch Lomond.



This is the main street at Inveraray, a planned 18th century village on Loch Fyne, West of Scotland. Nearby is the famous Inveraray Castle.


A view of Loch Ness from Castle Urquhart. Sadly, no monsters were evident during our visit.

This is Duff House in Banff, a very impressive mansion designed by Robert Adam and built between 1735 and 1740 as a seat for the Earls of Fife. We had some tea there. The main building is open to the public.

Here are a couple of heroes- but not local to Pennan! The red phone box was one of the stars of this film

View of Pennan ,which precariously sits between the sea and high cliffs.

The following four images are of Dunnottar Castle which has close connections with Clan Keith. The castle dates from the 1290s and is now a formidable ruin after experiencing a very chequered history. Access is not for the fainthearted!

We have seen these folks somewhere before!



View of Peterhead Harbour. Not one of Scotland’s top tourist destinations but interesting as a busy commercial port. Surprisingly, there was a seal basking in the dirty water around the moored vessels.

Here is the Royal Family’s private Highland residence at Balmoral which features an interesting Highland garden.

Highland scenery at pass of Glenshee

A couple of dog lovers at the rent-a-dog depot.


A colourful display at Scone Palace.

Whatever type of bird this is it was certainly strong on noise and assertiveness.


View of Scone Palace which dates from 1802. However, sits on the site of older buildings which were associated with the famous Stone of Destiny which was used for the inauguration of the Kings of Scotland and which now resides in Edinburgh Castle.


Palace of Holyrood House, Edinburgh. Unfortunately, this was closed to visitors due to an official function but we did witness the changing of the guard.


High Kirk of St. Giles, Edinburgh.This is the only parish church of medieval Edinburgh and the home of Presbyterianism. Inside is the famous Thistle Chapel which contains elaborate ornamentation and fine wood carvings.

View of the Royal Mile, Edinburgh from John Knox’s House.

Here are some unusual gate posts found on the Royal Mile.

This image is of Canongate Kirk which was built in 1688. The churchyard holds the burials of many famous people including Adam Smith.

Interior of the Scottish Parliament building.

Exterior of the Scottish Parliament. Architecture is somewhat controversial.

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