This morning I took my laptop to have some repairs undertaken and found myself close to the Forth & Clyde Canal at Anniesland, Glasgow. This canal has a long history, being at the forefront of the industrial revolution when it was built in the late 18th century (work commenced 1768) to link the east and west coasts of Scotland’s industrial heartland. It operated until 1963 and was subsequently re-opened in 2001. The canal covers a 35 mile route which, intriguingly, closely follows the line of the Antonine Wall built some 1600 years previously by the Romans. Today’s rail and road routes follow a roughly similar line of communication.

It is possible to cycle and/or walk along the canal between Glasgow and Edinburgh, a challenge I have longed planned to take up.

Today, the canal is made used by leisure craft and has become something of a wildlife refuge.

The following images cover only a tiny snapshot of the waterway. However, watch this space for more images when I get round to traversing the route by cycle.

This is a waterside restaurant/cafe ‘Lock 27’. There are 39 locks in total.

Whilst taking some pics I came across a couple out walking who had spotted a heron.


Here is the lock
Lock and bridge
Waterbirds in formation, mainly swans and ducks

This canal is not normally on visitors’ main hit list. It is, however, an important part of Scotland’s industrial archaeology. Boat trips are available, in addition to walking and cycling. I am looking forward to my cycle ride along the banks.

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