Today, I escorted a small group walking tour of central Glasgow which included a visit to Glasgow Cathedral.

The origins of this religious site are closely linked with St. Mungo or St. Kentigern ( one and same person) dating back to the 6th century AD. The present building mainly dates from the 13th century and is the only Scottish medieval Scottish cathedral to have survived the Reformation.

Here is a view taken from the Choir looking towards the Nave.

St. Kentigern’s Tomb


This is the Blackadder Aisle which dates form the late 15th century and is named after Archbishop Blackadder. The Aisle was originally intended as a crypt but is now, effectively, a side chapel and a popular venue for weddings. The ceiling is covered by a fascinating collection of carved medieval bosses.

This is the Nave where, in medieval times, layfolk would have assembled and worshipped. Originally, the Nave contained at least 14 alters the existence of which can be detected today by marks on the stone pillars.

Stained glass over the entrance door.

This video shows stained glass windows dating from 1951 which were installed by the Trades House and the fourteen incorporated trades of Glasgow:

  • Cordiners ( shoemakers)
  • Skinners
  • Glovers
  • Masons
  • Maltmen
  • Wrights
  • Gardeners
  • Weavers
  • Coopers
  • Woodbinds
  • Barbers
  • Bakers
  • Fleshers ( Butchers)
  • Bonnet makers and Dyers.

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