This morning, Glasgow remained gripped in the maw of a harsh winter. The sky was overcast, temperature at or below zero together with intermittent snow storms. On the plus side, being a public holiday, the roads were incredibly quiet. Not surprisingly, I returned home very cold and wet due to penetration of the wet snow through gloves and footwear.

I decided to set off on my bike to visit Glasgow Green, a historic working class area near the centre of Glasgow and close to the River Clyde. Most of the time I was taking photographs during a snow storm, a feature which obviously impacts on the quality of the images.

Here is Nelson’s Monument approached from the City end of the park.

A close up of the Doulton Fountain, the largest terracotta fountain in the world which dates from 1888. At this time Britain’s global empire was at its zenith and the various carvings depict scenes and stereotypes from the empire. Refer also video clip at foot of this post.

Here is a view of the Doulton Fountain with the Peoples Palace in the background. The Peoples Palace and Winter Gardens date from 1898 on historic Glasgow Green and were established for the benefit of the industrial workers of Glasgow’s East End. Today, the building is primarily a social history museum.

Tour bus-still running despite the inclement weather.

This was the Templeton Carpet Factory, an Italian inspired design based on the Doge’s Palace in Venice. Now a Business Centre.

This strange assemblage of metal posts were originally set up for the drying of clothes. Glasgow Green was the site of traditional ‘Scotch Washing’ which entailed tramping washing in large tubs, a practice superseded by the wash house.However, Glasgow Green continued to be used for bleaching linens in the sun well into the 20th century.

There is a long tradition of rowing on the Clyde. The following two images show sculling in process.


Here is a video of the Doulton Fountain. Bear in mind snow conditions.

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