This evening, I am departing from current winter snow and ice theme and winding back to the summer and scenes of one of Scotland’s largest lochs (lakes), Loch Linnhe.

Fisrtly, the name  ‘linn’ occurs widely in Scotland no doubt a function of two separate but similar linguistic terms for bodies of water. Llyn was the Brittonic (Welsh) word for lake whilst linne is Gaelic for pool. The word follows the languages and therefore is found in most parts of Scotland except the S.E. because neither of these languages was ever dominant there. Loch Linnhe as a name is of relatively recent usage and functions in context of a large inlet to the sea. The loch itself stretches from Fort William on the west of Scotland to Isle of Mull, a  distance of some 9 miles (14km).

Loch Linnhe formed as a result of the Great Glen Fault which is a long strike-slip fault that dates back about 400 million years  which includes Loch Ness and is linked to the same fault in northwestern Newfoundland which runs into the Gulf of St Lawrence.

Although one of the smaller of Scotland’s lochs it is viewed by many thousands of visitors each who use the road which tracks the loch from Oban up to Fort William via Glencoe. It impresses as very peaceful with little boat traffic or other activities in evidence. On the southern tip is the Isle of Mull, also a popular tourist destination, famous for its landscapes, seascapes and conection to Iona.

At Fort William it is possible to literally dine on the loch in the form of the Crannog Restaurant which specialises in High End seafood.

Overall therefore, Loch Linnhe offers a fascinating combination of linguistic and geological history combined with impressive but peaceful scenery.

The images below were taken from the Isle of Mull looking north-east where the loch enters the sea.

Loch Linnhe, Scotland

View of Loch Linnhe

 

Loch Linnhe, Scotland

View of Loch Linnhe

Loch Linnhe, Scotland

View of Loch Linnhe

Elsewhere today, I have been working on the detail of tours for 2011 and just responded to an enquiry for a new, small group tour of Scotland.

Weather here is now relatively mild-the lull before the storm. The next few days are expected to see a return to the arctic conditions of late with severe cold, ice and snow.

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