Glasgow Necropolis

Glasgow Necropolis, Scotland

This evening, I am focusing on Glasgow’s famous Necropolis which has become a visitor attraction in its ow right.

Necropolis means City of the Dead. There are two such burial grounds in Glasgow; the one under reference and the southern Necropolis close to the Gorbals area.

The Glasgow Necropolis is located on a high point close to Glasgow Cathedral (also a major visitor attraction).  The burial ground developed  from around the 1830s as a function of limited and unhygienic burial space elsewhere in Glasgow in turn a function of the city’s rapid population growth due to industrialisation.

The Necropolis evolved as a burial ground for the rich, famous and powerful in what at the time was a world class city known as the ‘second city of the (British) Empire’. Here can be found a collection of stunning and impressive burial monuments reflecting the wealth and importance of the persons venerated. There is even an official Heritage Trail guiding visitors around the extensive collection of monuments, vaults and mausoleums. At the pinnacle is 58ft high monument to 16th century Protestant reformer, John Knox which was erected in 1825 and thus pre-dates the Necropolis proper.

Overall, a fascinating place which, due to its elevation, offers good views of Glasgow City and the nearby Cathedral. I will be taking a small group to visit later in the month. 

Glasgow Necropolis

Glasgow Necropolis, Scotland

This is the Aitken of Dalmoak Mausoleum which comprises four compartments and was designed (1875) in the Greek renaissance style.

Glasgow Necropolis

Glasgow Necropolis, Glasgow

 This is the Monteath Mausoleum (1842). This family made their fortune in India.

Glasgow Necropolis

Glasgow Necropolis, scotland

Elsewhere I have been occupied with two tour itineraries and responded to a new enquiry for a three day whisky tour of Speyside and the Highlands.

Be Sociable, Share!