This evening I am continuing a West of Scotland geology theme which first featured in this blog post

The West of Scotland is endowed with a rich and diverse geological history evidence of which can be found within about one mile of Portencross Castle and in the general direction of Largs.

This small stretch of water covers a time gap of 30 million years. The rock in the foreground has the appearance of concrete but is classified as ‘conglomerate’ comprising a mix of coarse gravel, cobbles and occasional boulders all set in a solid sand mix. The conglomerate was formed about 380m years ago.

30m year Time Gap separated by short stretch of water

30m year Time Gap separated by short stretch of water, Portencross.

 

380m Year Old Conglomerate Rock

380m Year Old Conglomerate Rock nr Portencross

This image shows a 300m year old dyke running east-west from the cliffs to the sea. This is made of igneous rock which was once molten lava.The ridge has been left exposed because the constituent rock is much harder than the softer sandstone surrounding it.

Dyke of Igneous Rock running East-West

Dyke of Igneous Rock running East-West nr Portencross

This image shows a raised beach on the right. About 10,000 yeas ago the sea would have reached the cliffs but the land subsequently rose following end of last ice age leaving the former beach stranded and is now a hay field.

Raised Beach nr Portencross

Raised Beach nr Portencross, Scotland

 

A fascinatig area for visitors wish to connect with the geological past.

Be Sociable, Share!