Entrance to Fort George

Entrance to Fort George, Scotland

 This evening, I am focusing on a stunning piece of 18th century military engineering as manifested in the 250 year old Fort George near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. The catalyst for the construction of the fort was the Jacobite Rising which was finally crushed at the Battle of Culloden in 1746.This was a failed attempt by the House of Stuart to overturn the Hanoverian dynasty. However, the Battle of Culloden proved conclusive and after that event the Highlands remained peaceful notwithstanding which the fort has continued as army barracks to this day. The fort was designed by military engineer, Major-General William Skinner as an impregnable base for George 11’s army in the north of Britain. The complement was some 2000 men comprising two field battalions of infantry, gunners and officer cadre. The building included staff blocks, barrack blocks, powder magazines, ordnance and provision stores, a bakehouse, brewhouse and chapel. A compelling visitor attraction, especially for persons interested in the military. The western tip offers good views over the Moray Firth  where, occasionally, dolphins can be seen feeding. Here is the parade ground  near the front entrance. Parade Ground, Fort George

 Defensive bastion with view towards Moray Firth.Defensive Bastion over Moray Firth

 This defensive ditch would have served as a killing ground. Principal Ditch, Fort George

  Barrack Square, Fort George

 Garrison Chapel at western end.Garrison Chapel, Fort George