St. Vincent Street Church, Glasgow, Scotland

 This evening, I am focusing on a particularly interesting example of Scottish architecture as represented by the St. Vincent Street Church in Glasgow.

This building sits on the junction of St. Vincent Street and Pitt Street. It was designed by Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson for the Free Presbyterian Church who still occupy it. The church dates from 1857-59 and is the only surviving intact church by Thomson.

Thomson lived 1817-1875 and attracted the moniker ‘Greek’ because his designs were inspired the architecture of ancient Greece notwithstanding that he never visited the country.

Thomson was deeply religious and an elder of the United Presbyterian Church. His religious beliefs also influenced his architecture.

As will be evident from the images below, the church is built on a man-made Acropolis on a steep slope. The porticoes are symbolic while the steeple has resonances from the Indian sub-continent.

The interior features cast-iron columns with extraordinary capitals and windows with huge sheets of rolled glass fixed which are fixed directly into the masonry.

St. Vincent Street Church, Glasgow, Scotland

St. Vincent Street Church, Glasgow, Scotland

St. Vincent Street Church, Glasgow, Scotland

 Here is a video clip of the church.

This church is a ‘must’ for those interested in Glasgow’s architecture.

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