Melrose Abbey, Scotland

This morning, I collected guests from central Edinburgh and proceeded as follows:

First to Melrose Abbey in the Scottish Borders region. This is a popular visitor site with the following history:

  • Established 1136 by King David who attracted Cistercian monks from Rievaulx Abbey in England.
  • Attacked by english forces in 1322 and 1385.
  • Rebuilding work undertaken in 15th century but nave was never completed.
  • Attacked by English again in 1545.
  • Went into decline during 1500s with denouement post 1560 Reformation.

The heart of King Robert the Bruce is buried here.

Melrose Abbey, Scotland

 

Melrose Abbey, Scotland

 

Melrose Abbey, Scotland

 

Next, we drove south into northern England. First stop was Vindolanda, an extensive Roman site which pre-dates Hadrian’s Wall and lies a short distance to the south of it. Occupation dates back to around AD 85. This is a very extensive military and civilian site withe excellent visitor facilities including a museum. During the summer period excavations are undertaken. Here were found the Vindolanda Tablets, one of Britain’s top historical treasures. The Tablets comprise routine Roman correspondence on slivers of wood preserved in anaerobic conditions and provide us with a unique insight into Roman life. 

Granaries at Vindolanda Roman Site

Vindolanda Roman Site

Temple at Vondolanda Roman Site

Workshops at Vindolanda Roman Site

 

Vindolanda Roman Site

 

Next to nearby Housesteads, one of the most popular sites on Hadrian’s Wall. This is a fort located high on a ridge and is integrated with Hadrian’s Wall. Here are granaries, HQ block, barracks and latrine.

Latrine Block at Housesteads Roan Fort

Commander’s House at Housesteads Roman Fort

 

Granary at Housesteads Roman Fort

 

Granary at Housesteads Roman Fort

Housesteads Roman Fort on Hadrian’s Wall

 

Finally, we returned north to Edinburgh arriving about 5.45 pm. Fortunately, the rain held off until our return trip.

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