Ferguslie Half-Timer’s School, Paisley, Scotland

Today I visited the skeletal remains of a former glorious piece of late 19th century architecture named the Ferguslie Half-Timer’s Schoool, Maxwellton, Paisley, S.W.Scotland.

This is a mix of architectural gem, social history and industrial history all rolled into one.

The school was opened in 1887 by the paternalistic (and wealthy)  Coats family who owned the massive cotton mills close to the site.

This school was very advanced for its time. It was dedicated to girls, accommodating about 400, who studied and worked (at the mills) on alternate days, hence the name.

The school was designed by architects Woodhouse and Morley and described by some as a “Florentine Palace” as no expense was spared on the architecture, as the images herein testify.

The school was under Coats control until 1904 and then underwent a number of occupancy changes until gutted by fire in 1998 and then suffered further, structural damage due to high winds.

It would be nice if this stunning architecture could be saved in some imaginative way.

Ferguslie Half-Timer’s School, Paisley, Scotland

Ferguslie Half-Timer’s School, Paisley, Scotland

Ferguslie Half-Timer’s School, Paisley, Scotland

Ferguslie Half-Timer’s School, Paisley, Scotland

Ferguslie Half-Timer’s School, Paisley, Scotland

Ferguslie Half-Timer’s School, Paisley, Scotland

Ferguslie Half-Timer’s School, Paisley, Scotland

Ferguslie Half-Timer’s School, Paisley, Scotland

Ferguslie Half-Timer’s School, Paisley, Scotland

Ferguslie Half-Timer’s School, Paisley, Scotland

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