Picnic Rock, Sandstone Outcrop at Rouken Glen, Glasgow

This morning I took the opportunity to connect with interesting examples of earth history at Rouken Glen Park, South Glasgow, Scotland.

Rouken Glen has been designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest because here can be seen layers of sedimentary rocks dating back 330m-320m years when Scotland was near the equator, occupying a position at edge of a land mass close to the sea. The layers comprise limestone, sandstone, mudstone and siltstone with the material transported at a steady and slow rate by river systems. The environment would have resembled today’s Amazon Basin.

The layers evident today represent a snapshot of about 1.0m years of sediment flows at a time of high sea levels.

The mudstone and limestone layers are known as the ‘Orchard Beds’ after a local farm in Giffnock, which no longer exists.

Image no 2 below shows steps carved into a layer of sandstone. This material was carried down from what is now Norway and deposited by a large river system which existed to the east of present-day Scotland. The image above of Picnic Rock is part of the same sandstone structure.

The sedimentary Orchard Beds contain a wide range of fossils which include:

  • Brachiopods
  • Crinoids
  • Gastropods

The image immediately below shows the effect of a rock surface scratched by the movement of glaciers in fairly recent geological times, maybe 12,000 years ago.

Rocks scarred by glacial movements at Rouken Glen, Scotland

Steps carved into layer of sandstone, Rouken Glen, Glasgow

Sedimentary Rocks at Auldhouse Burn Gorge, Rouken Glen

Auldhouse Burn Gorge at Rouken Glen, Glasgow, Scotland

Sedimentary Layers at Rouken Glen, Glasgow, Scotland

Sedimentary Layers at Rouken Glen, Glasgow, Scotland

Sedimentary Layers at Rouken Glen, Glasgow, Scotland

Sedimentary Layers at Rouken Glen, Glasgow, Scotland

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